Malnutrition a threat with use of climate-resilient crops, scientists say


From trust.org |Published Tue, 1 Jul 2014 09:30 GMT

Author: Isaiah Esipisu

KIGALI, Rwanda (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – As farmers move toward growing crops designed to meet growing world demand for food and stand up to tougher climate conditions, they may inadvertently be worsening malnutrition, scientists say.

Such “hidden hunger” stems from a lack of vitamins and minerals in some crops that replace staple favourites, and a narrowing of the range of foods eaten.

“When I was young, we used to feed on amaranth vegetables, guava fruits, wild berries, jackfruits and many other crops that used to grow wild in our area. But today, all these crops are not easily available because people have cleared the fields to plant high yielding crops such as kales and cabbages which I am told have inferior nutritional values,” said Denzel Niyirora, a primary school teacher in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital. read more>


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